Video Showing a Little Norwegian Boy who Can’t Afford Lunch Brings Tears to Millions

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The Norwegian government has been struggling to deal with orphaned children due to the lack of foster homes. To encourage people to adopt children, a creative team called Kitchen Leo Burnett put together a video for the Norwegian government and posted it to The Norwegian Directorate for Children, Youth and Family Affairs’ Facebook page, where it went viral. Another Facebook page, Everything About Silence, re-uploaded the video; the video has since been viewed more than 134 million times between June and July.

Amazing ❤️ Take care of each other ❤️

Posted by Everything About Silence on Thursday, June 1, 2017

In the video, a school bell rings, and children in a classroom pull out their lunch boxes to enjoy their lunch.

One little boy opens his lunch box. But there is nothing inside.

He then raises his hand and asks to be excused from the class because he had nothing to eat.

The little boy takes a drink from the water fountain, hoping that it would quench his hunger.

While the other children eat, the boy wastes time staring out the window.

Dejected, he returns to his seat and goes to put away his empty lunch box since there is no food in it.

But he realizes the box has become heavy. He opens the box and finds that it is no longer empty.

To his surprise, he finds that the box has been stocked with food.

The boy realizes that his classmates had shared their own lunches with him while he was out of the classroom.

The video ends with the line, “Solutions are often closer than you think” and encourages people to consider fostering children as the Norwegian government is in need of foster homes for children.

The video made a lot of people cry and inspired many to share stories of their children or students noticing classmates who were going hungry and sharing their food with them without being asked.

“We love the fact that the film resonates with so many people across the world. Sometimes small things can make a big difference. We hope this film can trigger people to reach out to children who need their help,” a spokesperson for The Norwegian Directorate for Children, Youth and Family Affairs told BuzzFeed News.